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J.D. is a regular contributor to the policy journal, Health Affairs. His work has also appeared in JAMA, Barron’s, The Wall Street Journal, the British Medical Journal, Modern Healthcare, and numerous other publications. His first book, Bleeding Edge: The Business of Health Care in the New Century, is required reading in many physician-executive MBA programs and health administration graduate in the U.S. His follow-up about health care policy and market dynamics, Oxymorons: The Myth of a U.S. Health Care System, was published in 2001 to critical acclaim; and his third book, a novel about the training of OB/GYNs, Catching Babies, was published in 2011.

Catching Babies (2011)
Oxymorons: The Myth of U.S. Health Care System
(2001)
Bleeding Edge: The Business of Health Care in the Next Century
(1998)

 

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Catching Babies (2011)

The birthing of a new baby is one of life’s great medical and human dramas. When it goes well, it is a loud and joyful mess. But when it goes badly, it is a travesty, devastating not only to hopeful mothers, but also to their doctors - regardless of how well they have learned to anticipate and navigate the myriad hazards of obstetric medicine. Catching Babies, J.D. Kleinke's forthcoming novel, charts the professional and personal struggles of those doctors, following a group of OB/GYNs as they complete their residency in a busy urban teaching hospital, embark on ambitious careers, and try to mend personal relationships neglected through years of training and sacrifice. 

Catching Babies also explores the broader landscape surrounding obstetrics and women’s health: the culture clash of religion, reproductive rights, and medical technologies; the emotional brutality of residency training; the economic imperatives and political realities that run the modern academic medical center; the plight of uninsured women in a broken health care system; and the ongoing civil war over abortion rights. In obstetrics, both the courage and callowness we have come to expect of individual physicians find some of their most dramatic expressions. Catching Babies spins these into a gripping mosaic of the obsessions, grandiosity, anxieties and heroism of those doctors who choose to preside over the joyful messes and heart-breaking travesties in our hospitals’ delivery rooms.

Catching Babies was published in March 2011 by Fourth Chapter Books of Portland Oregon, a new imprint launched this year by the creators of Portland’s Underland Press.

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Oxymorons: The Myth of U.S. Health Care System (2001)

Oxymorons is the much anticipated follow-up to J.D. Kleinke’s Bleeding Edge: The Business of Health Care in the New Century, published in 1998 and often hailed as the definitive roadmap for health care organizations seeking to survive and thrive under managed care. Oxymorons is a provocative, unflinching look at how the methods and madness of "managed care" often aggravated rather than attenuated the failure of the marketplace to fix the fundamental economic and organizational problems plaguing our health care system.

Oxymorons surveys the complex history and implacable dynamics of health care in America; it identifies a few unlikely guideposts for what we can reasonably expect the marketplace to fix; and it proposes broad regulatory solutions for those things we should no longer expect the marketplace to fix, informed by more than a decade of managed care’scorporate America’s desperate and often destructive attempts. The legislative reforms at the heart of Oxymorons are designed specifically to introduce real market forces in the U.S. health care system—by liberating that system from decades of failed business schemes and piecemeal, faulty, and often arbitrary regulation. Oxymorons includes a highly practical analysis of why well-meaning strategic initiatives undertaken by health care organizations so often fail—and why others often succeed, seemingly by accident. With its comprehensive survey of the complexities built into the broader health care system. Oxymorons outlines what kind of strategies health care organizations can reasonably expect to work, and what kind will not work no matter how well funded or implemented.

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Bleeding Edge: The Business of Health Care in the Next Century (1998)

In the 1990s, when the American people rejected the Clinton health care reform plan, they set in motion an experiment that competitive market forces would be the best way to fix what ailed the U.S. medical system. The experiment was commercial managed care. In America, health care is a business and under the disciplines imposed by managed care it finally started to act like one. But after managed care’s harshest medicine worked its way through our health care system - taming medical costs, introducing provider accountability, and educating consumers about hard choices – what was the prognosis for managed care itself? What about for the rest of the medical marketplace?

J.D. Kleinke's Bleeding Edge describes the larger revolution at work throughout the medical marketplace, detailing the conversion in the 1990s of the US health care system from folk art to full industrial organization. Though written more than ten years ago, Bleeding Edge is still required reading in many physician-executive MBA programs and health administration graduate in the U.S.

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